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Gallery

Courtesy of Carlos Nogueras-Ortiz (c.noguerasortiz@gmail.com), graduate student of the UPR-RP Department of Chemistry.

Nogueras

This outstanding image shows amphiphysin-1 (AMPH1) and human tau in a neuron from the hippocampal formation of a tauopathy mouse model. The synaptic protein AMPH1 (red) is visualized in the soma of a hippocampal neuron expressing human mutant tau (green). Anti-AMPH1 antibodies were recognized by anti-rabbit secondary antibodies conjugated to Alexa-594. Anti-hTau antibodies were recognized by anti-mouse secondary antibodies conjugated to Alexa-488. The nucleus was stained with DAPI (blue).

 

 

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Courtesy of Lucelenie Rodríguez- Laureano (lucelenie@gmail.com), undergraduate student of the UPR-RP Department of Biology.

Lenie

This image shows a single undifferentiated SH-SY5Y cell overexpressing FLAG-EFhd2S74D. Cells were transfected using Lipofectamine® Reagent with pIRES-EGFP plasmid that code for a Flag tagged EFhd2 phosphorylation mutant S74D. The pIRES-EGFP plasmid contains an internal ribosome entry site between the multiple cloning site and the EGFP coding region that permits the translation of FLAG-EFhd2S74D and EGFP in a single bicistronic mRNA. After 23 hours, the cells were fixed and incubated with Anti-FLAG® M2 to study the localization of FLAG-EFhd2 S74D and TO-PRO®-3 iodine to stain nuclei. The localization of the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) can also be seen in the image.

 

 

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Courtesy of Yancy Ferrer (yancyferrer@gmail.com), postdoctoral fellow of the UPR-RP Department of Biology.

Yancy

Embracing during neurodegeneration. Neurons of an Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patient (frontal cortex) were labeled with an antibody against PHF-1 tau (red), which binds hyperphosphorylated tau. The presence of PHF-1 positive cells is an indicator of an ongoing neurodegeneration process. Labeled in green, a calcium-binding protein named EFhd2, was found to associate with pathological tau in AD. In this image we observe, for the first time, these two proteins colocalizing in neurons (yellow), confirming the association of EFhd2 with pathology-related tau, “embracing” specifically in neurons doomed to die. Interestingly, complementary data in this article place EFhd2 in the “amyloid-club”, and introduces a new pathological feature in the complex panorama of AD.

This image was collected in the course of experiments that resulted in a recent publication Pubmed icon.

 

 

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Courtesy of Dr. Antonio H. Martins (baccin31@gmail.com), biochemistry professor at Central University of the Caribbean in Bayamón, Puerto Rico. Grant # 1U54RR026139-01A1

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5μM of Fluo-3AM in 0.5% of Me2SO were used to load microglia cells 30 minutes before addition of 40 μM of cembranoid 4R. At the end of experiment ionomycin was added.

 

 

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Courtesy of Dr. Carlos A. Luciano M.D., FAAN; Chair of the Division of Neurology and Co-Program Director of the Puerto Rico Clinical and Translational Research Consortium. University of Puerto Rico, School of Medicine.

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This outstanding video shows a three-dimensional reconstruction of a skin biopsy stained with antibodies against PGP9.5 and collagen IV to identify epidermal nerve fibers (green) and delineate the basement membrane at the dermal-epidermal junction (red). Note the tracings (white) of epidermal nerve fibers. This video was generated using the Imaris software in the course of experiments aimed at characterizing the cutaneous innervation in HIV seropositive children and adolescents. CIF-UPR offers this high-end software to all its users, just ask Bismark!

 

 

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Courtesy of Ricardo J. Fernández (ricardof_77@hotmail.com), undergraduate student of the UPR-RP Department of Biology.

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This outstanding video shows live-cell imaging of muscle derived, differentiated myotube cells incubated with Lysine-49 phospholipase A2 from the venom of Agkistrodon piscivorus piscivorus.

 

 

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Courtesy of José G. Grajales-Reyes (grajales08@hotmail.com), undergraduate student of the UPR-RP Department of Biology.

May 2012_Image

This outstanding image was collected in the course of experiments aimed at cav-1 silencing via shRNA plasmid electroporation in mice muscle. Using a SureSilencing™ shRNA plasmid from SABiosciences, they electroporated the tibialis anterior of young adult mice (6 months old). After 7 days, sections of 50 µm were acquired using a vibratome. Later, the fixed tissue was stained with α-bungatotoxin Alexa Fluor 555 (α-BTX), to mark the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Together with this α-BTX staining, GFP expression from the plasmid reporter was analyzed and localized to NMJ rich areas. As a result, they were able to pinpoint cav-1 knockdown fibers, which are innervated and could elucidate the interaction of this protein with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

 

 

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Courtesy of Manuel Delgado (manuel_delgado1@hotmail.com), graduate student of the UPR-RP Department of Biology.

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This outstanding video shows live-cell imaging of primary human macrophages isolated from whole blood. Monocytes were isolated from whole blood through Ficoll gradient and seeded into four-wells slides until differentiation to macrophages. The videos were collected to observe the normal behavior and viability after differentiation.

 

 

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Courtesy of Dr. Garrett E. Seale (garrett.seale@upr.edu), post-doctoral research associate in Steven N. Treistman's Lab at the Institute of Neurobiology, University of Puerto Rico.

March 2012_Image

This image shows a cultured pyramidal neuron isolated from embryonic rat hippocampal tissue. After growing for three weeks in culture, the neurons were fixed and stained with antibodies to MAP2 (blue), alpha-Tubulin (green), and the alpha subunit of the BK channel (red).

 

 

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Courtesy of José F. Gaudier-Pagán (jose.gaudier2@upr.edu), graduate student in the Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico.

Feb_2012 Image

This image was collected in the course of experiments that resulted in a recent publication Pubmed icon. The image elegantly shows a cross section of an adult worm (Fasciola hepatica) in which the FhTP16.5 protein (green), muscle (red) and nuclei (blue) were fluorescently labeled.

 

 

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Courtesy of Rosedelma Díaz, graduate student of the UPR-RP Department of Biology.

image of the month

Expression of AChR ε/GFP subunit fusion polypeptide upon electroporation in the mice muscle.  The pRK5-ε/GFP DNA was electroporated in the tibialis anterior muscle of 3-month-all FVB mice. Fourteen days later a longitudinal 50 µm section of the tibialis muscle was analyzed using confocal fluorescence images at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). The muscle was stained with α-bungatotoxin Alexa Fluor 647 (α-BTX) to mark synapse (magenta), DAPI to mark nuclei (blue), Phalloidin Alexa Fluor 555 to mark actin filaments. (A) ε/GFP polypeptides expressed in the muscle (green). (B) AChR at the NMJ. (C) Overlay of ε/GFP subunit and α-BTX shows that ε/GFP subunits were colocalized with the AChR at the NMJ (gray), demonstrating that they were assembled into the receptor complex. Scale bar equal to 10 µm.